Dating old photographs 1850 Free c2c online sex video chat

Whether permed or created with a curling iron, these female ancestors ended up with lovely 'dos.

Sharon Haskin Galitz sent in a 1928 graduation picture of her mother.

CABINET CARD Cabinet Cards are a card mounted photograph introduced in 1866, and tremendously popular, especially in the U.

S., from its introduction until just after the turn of the century.

A style of photograph first introduced in 1863 by Windsor & Bridge in London, the cabinet card is a photographic print mounted on card stock.

This allows for an extra 1/2" to 1" of space at the bottom of the cabinet card where the name of the photographer or studio was typcially printed.

AMBROTYPE The Ambrotype is essentially a glass negative with a black background that makes the image appear positive. Invented about 1854, the form lost popularity in the early 1860's when tintypes and CDV's replaced them. There are some wonderful ambrotype portraits still in existence, yet the process is much neglected by authors.

The only book I know on the process is out of print, but worth searching for if you can find a used copy: Ambrotype, Old and New by Thomas P. CALOTYPE The Calotype, sometimes called the Talbotype after its inventor, William H. Talbot, is a paper print made from a paper negative. S., this format was more common in England in the 1840's.

The cabinet card is similar to the smaller Dating a Cabinet Card: Details of a cabinet card, from the type of card stock to whether it had right-angled or rounded corners, can often help to determine the date of the photograph to within five years.

It is important to note, however, that these dating methods aren't always accurate.